“Deadpool, Vol. 3: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” by Brian Posehn

Deadpool, Volume 3: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly(Author: Brian Posehn) + (Year: 2013) + (Goodreads)


Review:

It took me a while to write this review, huh?! As in, I read the book 3 months ago.

I don’t think I want to continue with Deadpool. I’ve generally kind of given up on superhero comic books, and if I did continue, I don’t think he would be the one that I would choose.

Deadpool just makes me very confused. I always thought the Deadpool books were supposed to be funny, but in reality, they are just depressing and sad. Deadpool is a totally underrated human being and I can’t fathom the reasons for that. I know that sometime in his past he did bad things, but all that I’ve read about him says otherwise. He’s not really purposefully bad, he just kind of doesn’t have the constant dilemma of “Should I or shouldn’t I hurt bad guys”, which I, personally, think would be helpful for all superheroes. If you have the power to stop evil for good, why not do it? Oh, right, so that I can come back after 3 volumes and kill more people.

This volume was the most sad and depressing one out of the three that I read. And that was due to obvious reasons, that I shall not mention because of the large amount of spoilers. Nevertheless, I felt like even after learning Deadpool’s deepest, saddest secrets, the other heroes weren’t all that moved. Which made me believe Deadpool is considered an asshole for the sake of the existence of an asshole superhero and for no other reason.

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“Wonder Woman, Vol. 1: The Lies” by Greg Rucka

Wonder Woman Vol. 1: The Lies(Author: Greg Rucka) + (Year: 2017) + (Goodreads)


Review:

So… this was kind of mediocre. I had high hopes because I’ve started liking Wonder Woman a lot lately, but this comic book was nothing special at all, to be honest.

First of all, I think that there was an over-saturation of Wonder Woman this year, because this is the second of three things about her that came out that I personally know of, the movie, this comic book, and the Leigh Bardugo novel from the DC Icons series.

And what I don’t like about this fact is that they all kind of start the same and continue with minor differences.

Of course, the medium of all three is different, and yet, I started feeling the repetitiveness.

Out of this volume, I mostly enjoyed the origin story of Wonder Woman, which I was more or less familiar with, but I was confused by the other parts of the volume, which had no background whatsoever, so I felt kind of lost at certain points. This made me think it would have been better if we saw more of Wonder Woman’s near past, instead of the Themyscira story again and again.

The art… Well… not my cup of tea. Not that it was not pretty or anything, but it was not what I usually like. Sure enough, it had this superhero comic book style that to me seems kind of rushed and like not enough was invested in it. Wonder Woman herself looked very manly and not her usual beautiful self. And it also struck me that while Black Magick and Wonder Woman (both by Rucka), have different illustrators, all the female characters kind of look the same, despite the fact that the art is generally different.

While I feel on the fence about reading the next volumes, I have this feeling that I will not.

 

“Deadpool, Vol. 2: Soul Hunter” by Brian Posehn

Deadpool, Volume 2: Soul Hunter(Author: Brian Posehn) + (Year: 2013) + (Goodreads)


Review:

Ya’know, Deadpool just keep getting more and more sad the more volumes I read. And also more insane.

By that, I mean that the humor and the jokes are still there, but the bitterness is entirely too tangible. Especially those moments when no one wants to team up with Deadpool, despite his best efforts to be helpful and despite the fact that he takes quite a few killing blows for it.

One thing worth mentioning is the first issue of this volume. It was drawn in a very old school comic book style and it looked so convincing, that I wondered whether they hadn’t actually taken old issues. Until I found out that Deadpool didn’t even exist at the time, that is.

The story with hell was also pretty interesting, as it was sort of convoluted and unexpected, but it worked out pretty cleverly.

I can’t say whether I really like Deadpool as a character, though. And that is not because everyone else also hates him, but because there is such a focus on that hatred, that his personality is half sad doofus, half other people’s view of stinky old Wade. So I kind of want to continue reading, and I kind of feel like it’s getting nowhere, because we only see the tip of his personality and it doesn’t really move beyond that.

“Deadpool, Vol. 1: Dead Presidents” by Brian Posehn

Deadpool, Volume 1: Dead Presidents(Author: Brian Posehn) + (Year: 2013) + (Goodreads)


Review:

Aaaaand… eh.

The thing is, whenever I read superhero comic books, they never build up such tension as superhero movies do. The scale of the events of one comic book volume vs a movie is hard to compare, and therefore, I usually end up with less than I hoped for.

Dead Presidents was not bad or anything, it was just not that good, either.

The biggest gap for me between expectations and reality was the humor. I expected something hilarious, and instead all of the jokes were like:

Blah blah, okay, laugh now. Seriously, this is funny, guys… Actually, nevermind, it is kind of sad and depressing. Err, I will shut up now. Ha-ha.

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This being my first comic book contact with Deadpool, I couldn’t help but find it sad that he is such a despised character. He might have dumb, raunchy humor, but so far, he seems to be on the right side. So the general attitude of characters toward him just seems strange and uncalled for.

The best part of this volume were the actual dead presidents, all of whom had their weirdness. I also liked how most were mentioned for what they were most famous for, including Deadpool dressed as Marilyn for JFK.

I will continue with the next volume, as I have it at my disposal, but I am not sure whether I should give in to the temptation to expect something cool the second time around.

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And… ALTERNATIVE REVIEW

(Because I am an overworked dork and I reviewed this volume twice.)

This was not exactly what I expected. Not sure whether that’s a good thing or not.

For me, before the movie hype, Deadpool was a rather obscure comic book character. I remember his appearance in that terrible Wolverine movie, but because of how generic that version of Deadpool was, I seem to have completely wiped it from my mind until the new Deadpool came out.

In the meanwhile, right before the movie was released I started hearing more and more about Deadpool, so I finally got around to also reading the comic book.

For starters:

  1. It was not as funny as I expected. Don’t get me wrong, Deadpool is funny. But unlike the movie, there was more bitterness and sadness in his humor. For the most part, I didn’t think “Ha-ha”, I thought “You poor bastard…”. I also still don’t get why he is so hated. Sure, around him everything’s a bit bloodier, but that’s not to say that he’s a bad guy. At least not the version that I saw in this comic book. It just seemed that everyone hates him because he is a hated character. Which kind of makes me pity him.
  2. The story was way more out there than I would have thought. Considering that Deadpool is a mercenary and an assassin, I expected more fists than dead presidents. Title and all.

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Essentially, I enjoyed the bit about the dead presidents, though. It gave the volume a funky edge. The dead presidents of the USA rolled up like some rock band and I thought it was hilarious how they had ganged up in groups by common traits.

Also, that element of magic set interesting grounds for Doctor Strange’s cameo, which, for me, created another unlikely event in this comic book. From the little that I knew about Deadpool, I imagined him hanging out more with X-Men, than with Avengers and the likes, but this was a good example of how movie studios owning different characters and separating them does not influence comic books. Which is very, very cool, because there are several characters that will probably not appear in movies together, but I might end up seeing in a comic book. Wink, wink…

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“Captain Marvel, Vol. 1: Higher, Further, Faster, More” by Kelly Sue DeConnick

Captain Marvel, Volume 1: Higher, Further, Faster, More(Author: Kelly Sue DeConnick) + (Year: 2014) + (Goodreads)


Review:

I guess Kelly Sue DeConnick and I are just not meant to be. I hoped that Captain Marvel would change my mind, but it did not.

This book’s basically a poor man’s Saga meeting a poor man’s Guardians of the Galaxy

Having read Ms Marvel before this, I thought that this will be the magnified experience and that I will love it even more than Ms Marvel. The sad reality of the situation was that Captain Marvel is too much space and too little heart.

The story took a rather unexpected turn from my expectations with Captain Marvel deciding to venture into space and be an outpost avenger. The explanation for that, her being restless and needing to find her place in the world, was just a bit too juvenile for my tastes. Her mission in space, reporting to the Avengers and saving a girl in a coma, didn’t really elicit any response in me. I kept expecting a more exciting story to appear out of nowhere. In vain.

So, we joined Captain Marvel on a short journey of her meeting the Guardians of the Galaxy and deciding to make a team of outcasts on her own. Her opponents, just as her friends, were rather weak and not really threatening, and the stakes were very low for a superhero. Captain Marvel’s speeches, though… They were so needlessly dramatic and over the top that I couldn’t help cringing. This is something that I remember noticing in DeConnick’s writing earlier, too. Nothing much is happening, but the characters are making it seem like a poor man’s Shakespearean tragedy.

What I disliked even more than this soulless execution was Captain Marvel’s head gear.

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Nice mohawk. Not.

I get it that suits are made to look formidable and badass, but this is not what I would call badass at all. What’s the purpose of that head gear? How does it make her a better fighter to have her hair pulled up in the middle of her head? What the heck?

And I’m not even going to start with this strange, useless little skirt-thing that she has.

Other than that, I generally liked the art and the big, colorful landscapes. That was probably the best part of this volume.

Considering how much people seem to like Captain Marvel’s series, I will give it another shot with the second volume, but I’m afraid that they lost me with this space theme, so if the next one is also like that, I will remain unimpressed.