“Mythic, Vol. 1” by Phil Hester

Mythic, Volume 1(Author: Phil Hester) + (Year: 2016) + (Goodreads)


Unfortunately, this year’s Image comics Humble Bundle was a bit of a let down. I mean… if you haven’t read most of these, the prize is definitely worth it. However, they have been including the same volumes for the last two years, so there was almost nothing for me there.

Aaand this is where Mythic comes in. This was the only volume from the bundle that actually interested me, so I read it separately hoping for something fresh and groovy.

It didn’t live up to the expectations.

A group of mythical heroes, deities and gods gets together as a supernatural SWAT team. What could go wrong? A lot, apparently. The characters were rather flat and way too many. There wasn’t really much space for us to get to know them. Some of the characters got barely any introduction and the ones that did have a more detailed back story were just a few. At the end of issue #7, for example, it was mentioned that we will learn more about Asha. What we actually got in issue #8 were a few self-introductory sentences of the type of “I am powerful! I am life! You can’t kill me.” Dr. Baranski was an equally as underdeveloped character. It was entirely too convenient how she was and how her story went. And her entire personality was so over-exaggerated, that I couldn’t buy her motives at all.

The art was okay, nothing too spectacular or out of the box, but still pretty and detailed. The characters looked kind of old-school, but it was tolerable for the most part. I didn’t particularly like the depictions of human faces, because a lot of the time it was hard to distinguish certain characters.


On the other hand, the logo on the cover is really cool!



“Deadpool, Vol. 3: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” by Brian Posehn

Deadpool, Volume 3: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly(Author: Brian Posehn) + (Year: 2013) + (Goodreads)


It took me a while to write this review, huh?! As in, I read the book 3 months ago.

I don’t think I want to continue with Deadpool. I’ve generally kind of given up on superhero comic books, and if I did continue, I don’t think he would be the one that I would choose.

Deadpool just makes me very confused. I always thought the Deadpool books were supposed to be funny, but in reality, they are just depressing and sad. Deadpool is a totally underrated human being and I can’t fathom the reasons for that. I know that sometime in his past he did bad things, but all that I’ve read about him says otherwise. He’s not really purposefully bad, he just kind of doesn’t have the constant dilemma of “Should I or shouldn’t I hurt bad guys”, which I, personally, think would be helpful for all superheroes. If you have the power to stop evil for good, why not do it? Oh, right, so that I can come back after 3 volumes and kill more people.

This volume was the most sad and depressing one out of the three that I read. And that was due to obvious reasons, that I shall not mention because of the large amount of spoilers. Nevertheless, I felt like even after learning Deadpool’s deepest, saddest secrets, the other heroes weren’t all that moved. Which made me believe Deadpool is considered an asshole for the sake of the existence of an asshole superhero and for no other reason.

“Wonder Woman, Vol. 1: The Lies” by Greg Rucka

Wonder Woman Vol. 1: The Lies(Author: Greg Rucka) + (Year: 2017) + (Goodreads)


So… this was kind of mediocre. I had high hopes because I’ve started liking Wonder Woman a lot lately, but this comic book was nothing special at all, to be honest.

First of all, I think that there was an over-saturation of Wonder Woman this year, because this is the second of three things about her that came out that I personally know of, the movie, this comic book, and the Leigh Bardugo novel from the DC Icons series.

And what I don’t like about this fact is that they all kind of start the same and continue with minor differences.

Of course, the medium of all three is different, and yet, I started feeling the repetitiveness.

Out of this volume, I mostly enjoyed the origin story of Wonder Woman, which I was more or less familiar with, but I was confused by the other parts of the volume, which had no background whatsoever, so I felt kind of lost at certain points. This made me think it would have been better if we saw more of Wonder Woman’s near past, instead of the Themyscira story again and again.

The art… Well… not my cup of tea. Not that it was not pretty or anything, but it was not what I usually like. Sure enough, it had this superhero comic book style that to me seems kind of rushed and like not enough was invested in it. Wonder Woman herself looked very manly and not her usual beautiful self. And it also struck me that while Black Magick and Wonder Woman (both by Rucka), have different illustrators, all the female characters kind of look the same, despite the fact that the art is generally different.

While I feel on the fence about reading the next volumes, I have this feeling that I will not.


“The Fade Out: Act One” by Ed Brubaker

The Fade Out: Act One (The Fade Out, #1)(Author: Ed Brubaker) + (Year: 2015) + (Goodreads)


For some reason, I had completely different expectations about this book and I thought I was going to be reading a supernatural noir, instead of just a regular one.

The Fade Out, much to my disappointment, was a rather ordinary crime novel set in the late 40’s in Hollywood. I say disappointing, because this volume had every single characteristic of every other noir novel: a troubled main guy, who is unwillingly dragged into a murder investigation and has alcohol problems; a dead starlet; a shady media mogul; a shiny boytoy with a nasty personality; a good guy who is getting destroyed by the sad events, etc etc. As a plus, this book also has Clark Gable. It’s very fortunate that I watched Gone with the Wind just a couple of weeks ago, so I was more excited to see him than I normally would have been.

Character-wise, everyone is basically one of the cliches I listed above. Story-wise, the book isn’t much more original.

If I was expecting a supernatural thriller, it didn’t work out to begin with. However, even the volume that I ended up reading didn’t possess many redeeming qualities. Except for the art. I rather liked the art style. It had ups and downs – the ups being that it very well fit into the 40’s Hollywood style and it was very pretty; and the downs, a lot of the characters kind of looked like each other to a point I wasn’t sure who was who.

I usually go optimistically about comic book volumes, persuading myself to continue with the next ones, but I think I will pass on act II of The Fade Out.

“Deadpool, Vol. 2: Soul Hunter” by Brian Posehn

Deadpool, Volume 2: Soul Hunter(Author: Brian Posehn) + (Year: 2013) + (Goodreads)


Ya’know, Deadpool just keep getting more and more sad the more volumes I read. And also more insane.

By that, I mean that the humor and the jokes are still there, but the bitterness is entirely too tangible. Especially those moments when no one wants to team up with Deadpool, despite his best efforts to be helpful and despite the fact that he takes quite a few killing blows for it.

One thing worth mentioning is the first issue of this volume. It was drawn in a very old school comic book style and it looked so convincing, that I wondered whether they hadn’t actually taken old issues. Until I found out that Deadpool didn’t even exist at the time, that is.

The story with hell was also pretty interesting, as it was sort of convoluted and unexpected, but it worked out pretty cleverly.

I can’t say whether I really like Deadpool as a character, though. And that is not because everyone else also hates him, but because there is such a focus on that hatred, that his personality is half sad doofus, half other people’s view of stinky old Wade. So I kind of want to continue reading, and I kind of feel like it’s getting nowhere, because we only see the tip of his personality and it doesn’t really move beyond that.