“Going Postal, Discworld #33” by Terry Pratchett

Going Postal (Discworld, #33; Moist von Lipwig, #1)(Author: Terry Pratchett) + (Year: 2004) + (Goodreads)


Review:

Going Postal definitely ranks among my top 3 Discworld books. That is to say, Equal Rites will ALWAYS be my favourite, as it was my first, and the one that got me into Terry Pratchett to begin with. After that, the list gets blurrier, but nevertheless, Going Postal is among best.

I saw the Going Postal movie no fewer than 3 years ago and I loved it. Which was my reason to postpone reading this book after I suffered from a severe Terry Pratchett fatigue. Now I’m back, and I’m happy to be here.

Going Postal is essentially a book about hope. Whatever else is happening in this book, it’s actually a wide frame of the story of hope.

“And this was known as the greatest of treasures, which is Hope. It was a good way of getting poorer really very quickly, and staying poor. It could be you. But it wouldn’t be.”

And then later in the book:

“Welcome to fear, said Moist to himself. It’s hope, turned inside out. You know you can’t go wrong. You’re sure it can’t go wrong…

But it might.”

Moist, as a character, is a personification of the efforts to be good. Or to be better. The struggle against the easy way out, which is to just take what you want (and not even need), as opposed to struggling and fighting for what’s worth it. I found Moist mightily gratifying to read about. He was just my type of a main character, crooked and wicked, but motivated to achieve more; aware of his flaws, morally ambiguous, willing to take a wild chance; Attempting to do the impossible, because where is the challenge, otherwise?

I liked the secondary characters a lot too. They were all cleverly constructed and very interesting. I know that many would say that this is always the case with Terry Pratchett, but I have grown to feel a gap between his books. As in, same author, same world, and yet there are ones that I loved, like Going Postal, and ones that I really, truly hated. And usually, I can set the difference with the witches (whom I adore) and everyone else, most of all the guards, who don’t interest me in the slightest. However, in Going Postal the characters are definitely not magical, but are awesome nevertheless.

I also found something else I was afraid I would never experience again: marveling at Pratchett’s cleverness. It’s just that whenever I dislike the story, I fail to pay attention to the details, and while this is a character flaw, I feel that it is more or less justified with the idea that you can’t force yourself to like something, and the more you dislike it, the more you dislike everything about it.

Going Postal has given me a new push into the Discworld, and I’m excited to read to the end of the series sometime in the not-so-distant future.

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