“Everybody Rise” by Stephanie Clifford

Everybody Rise

(Author: Stephanie Clifford) + (Year: 2015) + (Goodreads)


Review:

Everybody Rise is one of the books I was most excited about when requesting on NetGalley. As a teenager I watched shows like Gossip Girl so I’ve already encountered one version of the power struggle in the New York social scene. Another point of view was welcome.

But overall, as ridiculous as parts of  Gossip Girl were, it was way more believable than Everybody Rise. What we have here is a book about the craziest, most ridiculous and possibly downright retarded person I’ve had the opportunity to read about. The biggest downfall of this book for me, by a very wide margin, was Evelyn. Her character is absolutely absurd. The metamorphosis she goes through in the course of the book is impossible. Evelyn starts out the book as a girl just trying to make do with her job, but she dedicated to a job all the same. At some point close to the end of Everybody Rise, the author would make you believe that she’s never worked a day in her life, except for PLU and that she’s never had any ambitions, which is proved as completely false by the beginning. Also, her relationship with her parents is cringe-worthy, not to mention her relationships with her friends. If she was as pathetic as described, she would have never climbed as high in the social ladder as she did. The most horrible moment, for me, was the Jaime chapter. That was a new level of disgusting I didn’t expect from this book. And all of her actions from that moment on were rendered totally insane, because I can’t believe anyone in their right mind would act like that after such a thing.

The writing was another thing I had some issues with. It would sometimes be normal and sane, and even provide some interesting information, and then the characters, and especially Evelyn, would start talking nonsense or we’d be reading about “linen-material linens”(?!?).

The thing that I DID LIKE about Everybody Rise is the idea as a whole. How far are you willing to go, how crazy are you willing to get, how much are you willing to sacrifice. Had it been better written and had the characters been better built, it would have made a comparison to classical favourites of mine such as Bel Ami and The Red and the Black. Sadly, such bold statements can’t be made about Everybody Rise.

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